Sissis Fantastiska Blogg

Here! Have some amature photos! *throws them at you then crawls under my desk to hide*

And possibly some drawings too...


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Reblogged from adh-me

bellifortis:

adh-me:

permanently pissed that “forty” isn’t spelled “fourty”

so is tag heuer

image

Reblogged from soresoftheopenheart

urhotmess asked: How do you make the flowers for the flower crown? like specifically what material is it? Its super cool and I want to make one I just don't know what I need.

trilliath:

littlecofiegirl:

soresoftheopenheart:

Hmm, I just reblogged it from another site, but I think I can help you in terms of what to buy and how to do it. If you click the link, it’ll take you to the complete photo post that shows you what you need. In any event, here’s the list:

  • Nail polish
  • Floral wire, a thin bendable wire is ideal. 26 Gauge is fine. imageimage
  • Floral Tape            image
  • Wire cutters/scissors
  • a pencil or cylindrical object to wrap the petals around
  • Ribbon (optional)

DIRECTIONS

  1. First, you’re gonna need to make the crown. You can do this by using the wire you already have or you can use an old headband or anything that you like that resembles a headpiece. Thicker wire is also fine for this step.image       As you can see, OP twisted two pieces of wire together and left loops at the end (to attach the ribbon). Then they covered it in brown floral tape.
  2. The second step is to make the flowers. Using your pencil/cylindrical object, twist the wire around it to create a ‘petal’. Repeat this until you have at least a couple of petals. 3-6 is usually fine, it’s really your call. image
  3. SLIGHTLY bend the petals back to create a natural looking petal.image
  4. After you are satisfied with the shape of your petals, cut out your flower, leaving some wire left to attach it to your crown. 
  5.  Repeat the first few steps and make the rest of your flowers.
  6. Take one of your flowers and CAREFULLY apply nail polish to it, one petal at a time. Think of it like making bubbles. It may be easier to pour the nail polish in a flat plate and dip it, or dip the entire flower into the polish.imageRepeat this for all your remaining flowers.
  7. Twist the two ends of your flowers together to form a ‘stem’.image
  8. Wrap the stems with floral tape, preferably with the same color you used in the base of the crown.imageRepeat this for all your remaining flowers.
  9. The third step will be attaching the flowers to your crown. You can do this a few ways. One way is to wrap the stems around the crown. Another way is to just wrap the stems with floral tape as you go along, like the OP did.imageDo this until all your flowers have been attached to your crown.
  10. At this point, you can tie the ribbons to the loops like OP did, or decorate it any other way you like. :)

image

Enjoy your new floral crown!

TIPS

  • You can purchase most of the items in Walmart, Michael’s or any craft or flower store. You can also order it online. :)
  • REMEMBER, this tutorial is just a guide. If you don’t want to use brown floral tape or if you prefer using the green floral wire, don’t be afraid to change it up. You can use any color or material your heart desires.

This is the link to the DIY Floral Crown post. 

Sorry for replying late. I hope this helps you with making your own crown. :)

holy shit this nail polish thing is so clever! 8O

This would be an amazing way to use up old nail polish…

Reblogged from myzaree

punkrockbetty:

myzaree:

A set from yesterday.

Perfect

(via wilwheaton)

Reblogged from art-of-swords

art-of-swords:

Handmade Swords - Earil

  • By Peter Lyon of Weta Workshop
  • Edition Size: 1
  • Measurements: Blade length: 915mm (36”). Overall length: 1217mm (48”). Weight: 1.94Kg (4 pounds 4 ounces). Balance point: 71mm (2.8”) along blade, measured from the shoulder of the blade

The sword has been made especially for the Weta Cave and Weta’s Online Shop to sell to the public. It is similar to late medieval European longswords, but with design flourishes transform it into a piece of art as well. A longsword is light enough and balanced to be used with one hand, but it can also be used two handed for powerful cutting blows. The blade is broad for much of its length, making for strong cuts, but comes to an acute point for effective thrusts, making this a true cut-and-thrust sword.

The individual parts have shapes and detail lines that blend into each other and continue into the next component, so that shapes continue even as the materials change, and the shapes of all the hilt parts draw the eye towards the diamond shaped bosses in the centre of the grip, filled with polished Paua (New Zealand abalone) shell each side. At the same time there is a strong central line through the hilt and along the blade, emphasising the straight and symmetrical shapes of the sword.

This sword has many nautical features which led me to the name, “Aearil”, which in Elvish means “Gleaming Ocean”. 

The straight blade is ground from spring steel bar, and has been heat treated to give the best possible combination of toughness and edge hardness. Historically blades were forged into shape and to remove flaws in the steel, but the consistency and high specifications of modern steels mean this is no longer necessary.

The bevelled edge is blunted for safety and display, but could just as easily be sharpened for cutting tests. The tang of the blade is strong and wide, and passes through the cross guard, grip and pommel, and is peened over the end of the pommel for maximum strength.

The cross guard is cut from a block of mild steel. From the centre block it projects along the blade and towards the ends, which are split into a fork. This is an unusual feature which I don’t recall being used on a sword before. The cross is set onto the shoulders of the blade for extra strength and stability, as was done on medieval European swords to prevent the cross becoming loose and rattling through use.

The grip is made of beech wood, covered with leather. Thin cords under the leather create the designs, and the leather has been carefully tooled to fit into all the shapes created by the cords. The grip was mostly drilled out then fitted by heating the tang and burning out the remaining wood for a tight fit, and finally glued in place. It is a two handed grip; the foregrip is straight to give a strong gripping surface, while the waisted shape of the upper grip encourages the second hand to nestle into the inside curves of the pommel.

The mild steel pommel is also a counterweight for the blade. It is shaped somewhat like a fish tail, with curved and recessed faces to add interesting shapes, and also to remove weight and get the best possible balance for the sword overall. The pommel was set tight onto the tapering tang before the end was peened over.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Weta Ltd.

Reblogged from wallflowerbloom

as-cool-as-an-attempted-suicide:

wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.

(Dead Poets Society, 1989)

Me

(via wilwheaton)

Reblogged from bustedbitmap

portalgifs:

NO BUT YOU ALL NEED TO UNDERSTAND HOW FUNNY THIS IS THEYRE LITERALLY FILLING A ROBOT WITH BULLETS, LIKE BULLETS THAT YOU FIRE FROM A GUN. NOW NORMALLY FIRING A GUN TRIGGERS THE BULLET TO EXPLODE CREATING A PRESSURE THAT CAUSES THE TIP OF THE BULLET TO BE FORCED OUT OF THE BARREL AT A HIGH SPEED. 

WHaT CAVE JOHNSON’S TURRET’S DO IS LOAD A TON OF FUCKING BULLETS INTO THE CASE OF THE SENTRY LIKE IT”S A GODDAMN GUMBALL MACHINE AND THEN USE A FUcKIN SPRING LOADED PISTON TO FIRE IT THAT IS SO UNNECESSARY AND INEFFECTIVE LIKE NO WONDER CHELL CAN RESIST SO MANY BULLETS THE LIKELIHOOD ITD CAUSE ANYTHING MORE THAN A BAD BRUISE IS LIKE ONE IN A HUNDRED

(Source: bustedbitmap, via callmekairi)

Reblogged from gynocraticgrrl

marialuisa-pr:

gynocraticgrrl:

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

Jessica Rey - The Evolution of the Swim Suit

bolding mine

(via theangryviolinist)

Reblogged from kookootegu

kookootegu:

Happy Easter from Joy!

Reposting gets u reported (ʘ‿ʘ✿)

(via reptiglo)

Reblogged from losingmyself-gainingmyself
Reblogged from scaels

scaels:

valeatrahslane:

290pika:

scaels:

Band snapchats are the best snapchats

Godzilla Eats Las Vegas is best band piece

Please tell me this isn’t the flute part

Its piccolo

(via mahleriana)